RMIT Year 3, Semester 2, Jewellery, continued

11 03 2013

To continue with this project

The three most important pieces from this collection are below.

Exhibit #1: Quilted Fragments, Brooch, Silver

These fragments were found together in a recent find in regional Provence.  They have been arranged as they are proposed to have been originally in relation to one another.  The floral pattern seems to continue throughout the textile; as can be seen by the flower at the top of the image which is repeated in the bottom separate fragment.

Exhibit #1; image not to be reproduced without permission

Exhibit #1; image not to be reproduced without permission

Exhibit #2: Quilted Fragment, Brooch, White

These fragments show a pattern typical of the area in which they were found.  The home in which these were found had been fire damaged, as evidenced in these textiles.

Exhibit #2; image not to be reproduced without permission

Exhibit #2; image not to be reproduced without permission

Exhibit #5: Quilted Fragments, Brooch, Black

The motif used in these fragments is strikingly similar to that in Exhibit #1.  As such, the two groups together have been used to derive a possible detail of the extended pattern.  The black colouring of the textile is most unusual for this region, with most work done in white or brightly colour fabric.  As such, these fragments are somewhat of a rarity.

Exhibit #5; image not to be reproduced without permission

Exhibit #5; image not to be reproduced without permission

All of these brooches were constructed with fine silver very-thinly rolled sheets, pressed using a fly-press into a carved perspex block. This is similar to the construction of my Gold brooches. You can almost piece together these three pieces to derive the carved picture.

The motif I used in the carving was the False Sarsaparilla (Hardenbergia violacea) flower. This was a very special flower in my childhood – my grandfather and I would regularly go for bushwalks around his home and this was my favourite of the wild flowers.

The perspex backing was a reference to the museum practice of extrapolating the pattern of objects where only fragments remain.

My most favourite piece is Exhibit #5. I think it may even be the only piece I’ve ever made that became what I thought it would in my mind: the materialisation of the idea. The story behind making this particular piece still makes me smile – Kiko Gianocca was a guest lecturer for this project, and as we chatted about my progress I showed him the silver pieces and how I planned to connect them, and he said “this one must be black”. I looked at him silently for a little while; “it must be black?” I repeated; “oh it does not matter” he replied with a delightful shrug and dismissive gesture of his european hand. He was right. Oh my goodness he was so right.

This collection was the closest I came to free creation – where I felt less sure about the outcome and more willing to simply play.

… last post in this series: RMIT Year 3, Semester 2, Silversmithing
… see more projects from RMIT Year 3 here


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3 responses

17 03 2013
Inari

Karen, these are beautiful. Ever thought of continuing, exploring this theme further from where you left off, back then? I’d love to see …

17 03 2013
Karen

oh thank you Inari, you’re so lovely; I have thought of following this a little further … perhaps this year

8 07 2013
Quilt detail | Melbourne Jeweller

[…] A little detail of one of my ‘quilt fragment‘ brooches. […]




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