Showtime!

10 09 2014

Oh good lordy!
Look at what Gallery Funaki is doing ….

reproduced with explicit permission from Gallery Funaki

reproduced with explicit permission from Gallery Funaki

Holy moly!!!





Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery @ Gallery Funaki

16 08 2014

It just may be that Gallery Funaki has never looked more enchanting or amazing.

It’s breathtaking; full, though beautifully arranged, with work from artists selected for the inaugural Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery.

photograph taken with gallery permisison

photograph taken with gallery permission

It’s quite a treat to see such exceptional quality and variety in the one exhibition.

Especially attractive in my eyes were:

  • little precise and refined silver-white (surface-depleted) brooches by Jo Hawley; in the foreground in the above image
  • gold fine linear neckpiece by Hermien Cassiers
  • beautifully coloured pieces by Kaori Juzu; especially the blue one, it reminded me of Anish Kapoor, I could have become lost in the blue interior
  • the astonishing brooches by Lore Langendries; while I couldn’t see myself wearing one, the treatment of the material (fur) is wonderful and shows genuine pathos and understanding
  • paper and stitched brooches by Gitte Nygaard; left in the below image

Honestly though, it’s hard not to find something to admire, learn from or desire in every one of the pieces.

photograph taken with gallery permission

photograph taken with gallery permission

I’m sad I couldn’t take more photographs – the gallery was quite busy at the time I was there, and I don’t like to include people in images (they may be gift shopping or meant to be somewhere else etc!).

My previous post shared the prize winners.

The exhibitors are:

  • Ela Bauer (Poland/Israel/The Netherlands) , Alexander Blank (Germany)
  • Conversation Piece (Sweden) , Hermien Cassiers (Belgium)
  • Jane Dodd (New Zealand) , Patrícia Correia Domingues (Portugal/Germany)
  • Benedikt Fischer (Austria/Germany) , Emi Fukuda (Japan/Germany)
  • Sara Gackowska (Poland) , Kiko Gianocca (Switzerland) , Marcos Guzman (Australia)
  • Jo Hawley (England/ New Zealand/Australia) , Therese Hilbert (Switzerland/Germany) , Lucie Houdková (Czech Republic) , Linda Hughes (Australia)
  • Kaori Juzu (Japan/Denmark)
  • Jiro Kamata (Japan/Germany) , Inari Kiuru (Finland/Australia) , Jun Konishi (Japan)
  • Lore Langendries (Belgium)
  • Carlier Makigawa (Australia)
  • Thanh-Truc Nguyen (Germany) , Gitte Nygaard (Denmark/The Netherlands)
  • Nelly van Oost (France/Belgium)
  • Martin Papcun (Czech Republic/Germany)
  • Mette Saabye (Denmark) , Michihiro Sato (Japan) , Helen Shirk (USA)
  • Blanche Tilden (Australia)
  • Julia Walter (Germany/The Netherlands)
  • Reinhold Ziegler (Norway)

This exhibition is a must-see. The Gallery Funaki website has images of each piece from each artist.

The Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery is at Gallery Funaki until 13th September 2014.





Mari Funaki Award winners announced

13 08 2014

I’m sure regular readers are already aware of the fabulous news: the winners of the inaugural Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery were announced last night in Melbourne.

From Gallery Funaki’s facebook page:

The results of the Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery are in: the winner of the prize for an established artist is Kiko Gianocca with his series of 3 necklaces, ‘Veneer’.

The two emerging winners are Patricia Correia Domingues with her pendant from the ‘Duality’ series, and Sara Gackowska with her ‘Membrane’ brooch from the ‘Methamorophosis’ series.

The judges were also very impressed with the work of Inari Kiuru (emerging) and Jiro Kamata (established) and gave each a commendation. It’s been a wonderful night and congratulations to all!

screen shot from Gallery Funaki facebook page; click on image for original source

screen shot from Gallery Funaki facebook page; click on image for original source

I cannot wait to see all the pieces in person!





Karl Fritsch ‘yodel’ @ Gallery Funaki

11 07 2014

What’s not to love about Karl Fritsch I ask you?

Karl’s latest exhibition, yodel‘ at Gallery Funaki, delivers what you’d expect, and hope for, from this modern master – subversiveness, cheekiness, playfulness, unusual handling of materials, challenge, uncertainty, remarkable individuality, smirks, and absolute delight.

beautiful image courtesy of Gallery Funaki; image copyright belongs to the gallery

beautiful image courtesy of Gallery Funaki; image copyright belongs to the gallery

Exhibition media: “His rings, both precious and anti-precious, beautiful and proudly anti-beautiful, bear the weight and scars of centuries of embedded cultural belief about jewellery’s manifestation of status. Using precious materials as well as rough hewn aluminium, stones and glass, Fritsch’s work has the look of something buried for a thousand years while remaining utterly contemporary.
Selected works are also shown from a recent collaboration between Fritsch and Auckland based photographer Gavin Hipkins

exhibition media; courtesy of Gallery Funaki and the copyright remains with the gallery

exhibition media; with thanks to and courtesy of Gallery Funaki; copyright remains with the gallery

There are some truly monumental pieces in this exhibition, including those in the exhibition image (above). These are made of aluminium and set with brightly coloured stones. I admit to being both amused and uncomfortable with them.

They’re cheerful and hilarious in their chunkiness, scale and gaudy colour combinations … and in reflecting on them I realised that for some reason I do prefer my jewellery to be serious [which is entirely my burden to bear and not the responsibility of any artist to relieve me of it!]. I wondered if I may have found them more satisfying if the finish were more textured and bashed-about and a smidge less shiny-shiny [again, totally my perception]? I’d like to think more about these…

Ring #351, 2011; image with thanks to and courtesy of Gallery Funaki; copyright remains with the gallery

There were some rings that I genuinely fell in love with, much to my delight. Most especially a yellow gold ring set with orange garnets (above). The gold rectangular strip, perhaps 10mm by 2mm (or so), has been simply curved into a ring with a satisfying overlap; with five little pillows set with varying colours of tiny garnets. Completely delightful in my view. I tried it on, though sadly my skin tone doesn’t do it justice – it needs someone with more olive or tanned skin than I to bring it to life. Sigh.

The others that particularly appealed to me where the yellow gold ones, set with little stones. I suspect I’m in a matt gold kind of phase… how ridiculously gorgeous is the one in the image below?!

with thanks to and courtesy of Gallery Funaki; copyright remains with the gallery

with thanks to and courtesy of Gallery Funaki; copyright remains with the gallery

There is so much to look at and think about: 67 rings (with creations years varying from 2014 back to 2004), 2 bracelets, and 7 collaborative images and objects.

with thanks to and courtesy of Gallery Funaki; copyright remains with the gallery

with thanks to and courtesy of Gallery Funaki; copyright remains with the gallery; ‘Der Tiefenglanz (Cosmos)’, 2014, silver gelatin print, aluminium, cubic zirconia

The photographic collaborations with Gavin Hipkins are moody and interesting; though I did find myself somewhat distracted by the glory of Karl’s rings. The above is particularly amazing – the scale in the image is misleading, as I originally thought it may be about postcard size, but in fact it’s about A4 and so the scratches are forceful and have great presence.

It’s a surprise to me that my understanding of Karl’s work continues to deepen, and I’m glad for it. Go forth and see what you see too.

Karl Fritsch’s ‘yodel‘ is at Gallery Funaki until 9th August 2014.

—–

Other posts about Karl Fritsch:

20th December 2010: Returning to the jewel is a return from exile’ @ Tarrawarra Museum of Art

9th June 2010: Karl Fritsch ‘freeling‘ @ Gallery Funaki

—–

Update (12th July): after a little more thought, I wondered about the title of the exhibition … why ‘yodel‘?

A little bit of research later … consider these descriptions of yodeling: “repeated changes of pitch during a single note” or “oscillates on neighbor tones” or “an ornament or trill in phrases which have long syllables” and “the basic yodel requires sudden alterations of vocal register from a low-pitched chest voice to high falsetto tones” and of course its use as a means of village-to-village communication.

While I cannot speak for why the title was chosen, I do like very much the connections these little snippets create in my mind.

—–

Update (8th August): a review in The Age has also reviewed this exhibition

—–





Helen Britton ‘pairs of pieces’ @ Gallery Funaki

24 05 2014

Regular readers will know of my exceptionally strong admiration of Helen Britton‘s jewellery (she’s on my lust-list and I’ve been smitten for a while now).

Well, I was beside myself* while viewing her latest exhibition: pairs of pieces‘ at Gallery Funaki.

photograph taken with permission

photograph taken with permission

The exhibition media is eloquent and enlightening, and worth repeating in full:

“When I’m making my work, although I rarely have a clear idea of the end result, I am in pursuit of a fleeting vision that I chase along until the pieces start to materialize on my worktable. Over so many years of making I have observed that this often results in pairs of pieces. There they are then, in the end, these two friendly companions, singing together, vibrating at the right intensity, complementing each other, yet quite autonomous.

What happened along the way? Was there just too much to say to fit into one work? The vision is often dense and chaotic, so perhaps it is a kind of spreading and organizing within the creative process that produces the two possibilities. And this is jewellery after all, so there needs to be space for the wearer.

It not only like this though. At other times, works are being made or coming back to the studio. I lay them out to revisit them, learn more about them, and during this process I recognize quite clearly relationships between pairs, that may in fact be separated by months or even years. For this exhibition I have made and gathered works that examine this experience.”

Helen Britton, 2014

photograph taken with permission

photograph taken with permission

Once again the monochrome rings called out to me. They’re absolutely stunning.

If the one on the left in the image below hadn’t already been sold I expect I’d be fretting over whether to purchase it or not … completely amazing.

courtesy of the gallery; click on image for original source

courtesy of the gallery; click on image for original source

The neckpieces are beautiful too – which even surprised me, as I don’t usually respond to too much colouring in jewellery. There was a brooch with the most enchanting lavender / pale rose kind of colour that I couldn’t take my eyes from.

And then there was this ring .. swoon.

courtesy of the gallery; click on image for original source

courtesy of the gallery; click on image for original source

I also really liked the exhibition design: the uneven and rough-edged constructions are ideal stages for the jewellery.

Make sure you look at all of the images on the Gallery Funaki site – too beautiful. In fact, go and see it in person if you can.

Helen Britton ‘pairs of pieces‘ is at Gallery Funaki until 14th June 2014.

—-

* I may have squealed a little when I spotted the rings.
I’m also pretty sure I did a little skippy-dance as I made my way towards them.

—-





Mari Funaki Award

14 03 2014

I’m so pleased to share with you the news from Gallery Funaki (though I’m sure most of you have already seen it!):

We’re thrilled to announce the inaugural Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery. Mari was a unique and passionate advocate for contemporary jewellery in Australia, both through her own remarkable practice and her establishment and directorship of Gallery Funaki.

This Award aims to celebrate Mari’s legacy by rewarding the skills and vision of jewellers both here and overseas and by providing a platform for outstanding new work to be shown here in Australia. A panel of three judges (to be announced) will award prizes in both established and emerging categories, with total prize money valued at AUD$11,000.

For entry conditions and more information, please email Award Manager Chloë Powell at award@galleryfunaki.com.au or download the PDF below [link here].

The Award is generously supported by Vivienne and Leo Donati, Johannes Hartfuss and Fabian Jungbeck.

event media

event media

Important dates:

  • Applications close: 18 June 2014 (11:59pm, Australian Eastern Standard Time)
  • Finalists notified: 25 June 2014
  • Work/s received by: 30 July 2014
  • Award exhibition: 12 August – 13 September 2014

How absolutely wonderful.





‘PROJECT: Jewellery for T-shirts’ @ Gallery Funaki

4 02 2014

With this show Gallery Funaki launches its “series of occasional, week-long shows collectively titled PROJECT:  These short exhibitions explore collaborations, new enquiries and multidisciplinary approaches, and seek connections with artists from outside the jewellery field who engage with the body as a platform for their practice.

This is “PROJECT: Jewellery for T-shirts“, a collaboration between Helen Britton (of my lust-list fame) and Justine McKnight.

photograph taken with gallery permission

photograph taken with gallery permission

It was quite something to walk into Funaki and see it exhibiting objects so different from previous visits. The garments were beautifully serene, elegant, and sometimes gently animated by the zephyr through the open door. Being in a (familiar) gallery setting put me in the mindset of viewing them as works of art, more than simply clothes.

Exhibition media: “We’re intrigued by the interplay between clothing and jewellery. The physicality of one influences the other as we work with the weight of cloth or metal, the size and shape of elements, the texture of a surface or an edge. Then there’s the content: deconstruction, process, mark, gesture, structure and materiality. Transience. The forms react to one other, not only through the making process, but finally on the body as well: arranging, rearranging, each movement suggesting new possibilities.

photograph taken with gallery permission

photograph taken with gallery permission

It dawned on me – why don’t we makers do this more often? Make jewellery in response to specific garments? I know it’s done for fashion collections, presented in shows and such. And I imagine of course for high-end ensembles. What about our everyday favourite items? Why shouldn’t your favourite t-shirt have its own custom designed brooch (especially positioned of course) or neckpiece? [Or does everyone do this and no-one told me?!]

I love this idea; and I very much enjoyed the beauty of the outcome. The sympathy and understanding between the two makers is obvious.

The combination at the front of the above image is the most striking. Though it is closely rivaled by the one at the back of this row, with the black marks scattering across the body and a gorgeous brooch worn on the upper left.

I think it’s super that Gallery Funaki have introduced these mini-exhibitions – little forays into perhaps more adventurous arenas, giving the gallery and its visitors some wriggle-room to experiment and play and perhaps even take a risk. I do look forward to the next one.

PROJECT: Jewellery for T-shirts‘ is at Gallery Funaki until this Saturday 8th February.