Calendar: September 2014

31 08 2014

post last updated: 31st August

all month:

  • Personal Space Project (Canberra and online), Sharon Fitness [link]
  • Object (Sydney), Lola Greeno ‘Cultural Jewels‘ [link]; “Lola Greeno: Cultural Jewels is the eighth in our Living Treasures: Masters of Australian Craft series. Our first Indigenous Living Treasure, Greeno is a shellworker and artist from Tasmania, whose career spans 30 years. Her stunning work is highly coveted by both public and private collectors alike.“;  until 11th October

1st September: e.g.etal, Natalia Milosz-Piekarska ‘Lucky Fool‘ [link]; ““I have found myself fascinated with charms and talismans to this day. The power they can hold, the trust and faith we put in them and the way in which they can direct our lives’“; until 20th September

exhibition media

exhibition media

6th September: last day for Stanley Street Gallery (Sydney) ‘Over your Head‘ [link]

6th September: last day for Spare Room 33 (Canberra) ‘You’ve Lost Me‘; private exhibition of contemporary jewellery, viewing by appointment, contact susan@dexterior.com.au

7th September: last day for Lord Coconut ‘Adornment‘ [link]; “Jewellers, artisans and designers have been given a found bone and instructed to adorn it in a masculine way, or use the bone when producing a piece of adornment for men, especially jewellery. …. The exhibition is a comment on the current explosion of body adornment, both permanent and temporary, as seen in fashion today.

12th September: last day for Manon van Kouswijk ‘Out of the Office: 100 Necklaces worn by a Foyer‘, at The Other Side; situated in the entry foyer of Paul Morgan Architect’s Design Studio at Level 10, 221 Queen St, Melbourne

12th September: last day for Jam Factory (Adelaide) ‘White Heat‘ [link

13th September: last day for Pieces of Eight, jewellery exhibitions [link]

  • Lisa Roet ‘Humanzee‘; “We are proud to present Humanzee, a new project from renowned visual artist Lisa Roet. For 25 years, Roet has been working with the image of the ape and the monkey. Sculpture and jewellery connect in this new body of work, carved and cast, materials including gold, silver, bronze and bone become extraordinary pieces for man and woman to adorn themselves with.
  • Nicholas Bastin ‘Compact Museum Gacha Gacha'; “We’re pleased to present Nicholas Bastin’s Compact Museum Gacha-Gacha, an exhibition of small-scale objects and jewellery presented in a reduced in scale Art Museum. These works draw on the Gachapon, a Japanese term used to describe a particular type of urban toy-like object, that are almost endless in their depiction of diverse subject matter from popular culture. Nicholas Bastin makes jewellery and objects inspired by the representation of mythological archetypes in the products of popular culture. 

13th September: last day for Gallery Funaki ‘Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery‘ [link]; see the gallery page for the incredible listing of exhibiting artists; see my review post

14th September: last day for Arbor Brunswick ‘Brunswick Iconic‘, part of Craft Cubed [link]; “Jewellers are asked to take a photo of an iconic Brunswick thing (building, park, street, etc.) and then respond to it with a specially made piece of jewellery. The exhibition will be held in the lit window, so people are able to view it any time of day. The image and finished jewellery piece will be displayed together.

24th September: Powerhouse Museum (Sydney), ‘A fine possession: jewellery and identity‘, will “celebrate the central place of jewellery in our lives from antiquity to the present-day through over 700 iconic and rarely seen objects” [link]

30th September: Studio 20/17 (Sydney), Nicola Bannerman ‘Entwine’ [link]; “Nicola, has always held a deep fascination with the recurring patterns in the natural world. She draws inspiration from the simplest spiral, to designs of great complexity where wonderful symmetry can be found in what at first glance may seem to be random formations. The inspiration for ‘Entwine’ started in the garden, noticing repetitive patterns in leaves and spiral growth in flowers. These pattern possibilities in nature are endless, some occurring in surprising places – spirals in snails and cyclones; strong geometric angles in huge mountain ranges and exquisite crystals. The rotational symmetries in the huge varieties of sea anemones are another world of inspiration.“; until 18th October

please tell me of other exhibitions or events
also check out Melissa Cameron’s excellent informative blog (especially for competitions)
also, check out ArtPrizes

Plan ahead:

1st October: last day for applications for Schmuck and Talente 2015 [link]

2nd October: Craft, ‘Craft to Consumer: Selling Online‘ seminar [link]; booking required

15th November: last day for application to Preziosa Young 2015 [link]

… last calendar post: Calendar: August 2014





Sunrise series

24 08 2014

This is my favourite series of sunrise photographs I’ve taken to date.

It was the most astonishing sunrise I’ve ever seen. Full. Stop.

sunrise series

sunrise series





Curse the flu

22 08 2014

So I have the flu. I’ve had it all week.
It’s a right pain. And I’m a total sook when I’m unwell.

Worse, it means that I now miss out on seeing ‘Wondernamel 2014‘ and ‘Around The Table‘ at First Site Gallery.

I wish their shows went for longer. Or that they were open for a few hours on a Saturday.
For those of us who work full-time (office hours) it’s nigh on impossible to see them.

First Site has put up some photographs from the opening night of the exhibitions – but they are more focused on people than the objects, and it’s hard to really get a sense for the works.

Oh well, there goes my hope I could vicariously visit the show through the wonder of the internets. Sad.

Did you go? Do you have photographs of the work you’d like to share?





Bin Dixon-Ward ‘Grids’ @ Craft

20 08 2014

Bright colour abounds at Bin Dixon-Ward‘s ‘Grids‘ exhibition at Craft.

'Small City'

‘Small City’

I like that each ring in the above collection has its own stand. On the surface the forms may appear repetitive, but subtle differences are the reward for careful inspection.

Exhibition media: “Bin Dixon-Ward’s exhibition is a playful exploration of the grid as it appears in the urban form.

Grids are everywhere, in the layout of our cities and towns, in land divisions for agriculture and housing, floor plans and building facades; the urban grid has endless translations.  As a fundamental unit of our endeavours to manage and control our environment, we use the grid to protect us, to navigate our way and to mark and control our boundaries.  The grid maintains a structure that is both self-supporting and flexible. Its foundations remain intact even when the surface is altered and eroded through use.

installation

installation

My sense is that the wearable pieces are far more powerful on a body than still and on display.

I am interested in how this technology will impact future creation of adornment – perhaps even self-service jewellery, where a ‘designer’ makes their original design available online and a person can purchase it to have it printed themselves in whatever colour and material they desire.

Bin’s website has some wonderful images of her work. And the exhibition was rapturously written about by the ladies at HandMadeLife (with beautiful photographs).

Bin Dixon-Ward’s ‘Grids‘ is at Craft until 30th August 2014.

—-

Update (21st August): Bin’s work is featured in one of the glossies – check out Pieces of Eight’s blog.

And the eagle-eyed among you would have spotted that the works list says there are 10 pieces in the ‘Small City‘ collection, but there are only 9 on the table. When I visited I counted and recounted about five times to be sure – then wondered if perhaps one had sold (though it’s exceptionally rare, if not unheard of for a piece to be removed from an exhibition before its finished); then had a sinking feeling that some despicable [swearword] had stolen one. But thankfully, after checking the original photographs from Craft, it seems that there may have always been 9 … just a little typo. Phew.

Bin has also been mentioned in the following previous blog posts:

—-





Vito Bila ‘Unseamly Vessels’ @ Craft

19 08 2014

There simply aren’t enough silversmithing exhibitions.
Large scale metalwork is magnificent.
Vito Bila is one of smiths I admire most.
He is showing a collection of work at Craft, titled ‘Unseamly Vessels‘.

It’s a particularly apt title I think, for in my eyes the work has evolved from exceptionally minimal vessels (of many years ago) to these pieces …

installation

installation

… where the seams are distinctly obvious, exaggerated or highlighted. Some with texture, some with technique, and some with thick application of alternative metals (in the aluminium on copper vessels).

A handful of the pieces on show are from 2007, with others from 2011 and since.

The below vessels are the standouts to me – stainless steel, with precision-spaced welding dots … beautiful. The paper studies for these were in the previous exhibition I saw of his work, at Monash.

Vessel cluster #1 (2012)

Vessel cluster #1 (2012)

I’m at a bit of a loss with respect to the chosen exhibition design (the off-angle green one at the back upsets my peculiar penchant for lined up edges) – perhaps the uneven and distinct tables reflect the seams on the vessels. That said, the pre-loved work tables are a most effective contrast to the refined cabinets of the ‘Transplantation‘ exhibition in the same room.

Best of all, it pleases me no end that there is not a highly polished surface in sight.

Vito Bila ‘Unseamly Vessels‘ is at Craft until 30th August 2014.

—-

See also: September 2012 Vito Bila ‘narrative

—-





‘Transplantation’ @ Craft

18 08 2014

August is always a fabulous month at Craft – this month is no less than a jewellery and silversmithing extravaganza.

Transplantation – A sense of place and culture – British and Australian Narrative Jewellery‘ is a traveling exhibition curated by Professor Norman Cherry from the University of Lincoln (England).

installation

installation

Exhibition media: “This exhibition of contemporary narrative explores the sense of place and cultural identity through the theme of transplantation. Artists based in the UK and Australia have explored their own sense of place and individual cultural identity as a consequence of their personal and family experiences of transplantation.

Jewellery provides a means of recording memory and experience in a portable and wearable form. Through this medium it is possible to express ideas, thoughts, and concerns, which may not be achievable in other ways. Twelve contemporary jewellery artists from the UK and Australia have been selected to create up to three pieces of work each, which will articulate the notion of transplantation in a tangible form.

The exhibition design is reminiscent of a museum layout or like cases displaying specimens … no doubt quite deliberate given the concept. I think this kind of display puts me in mind of looking at ‘old or extinct things’ – bowing down to see the pieces, under glass, and in really very beautiful quality cabinets.

The Australian artists are separated from the English artists – two groups of six cabinets.

Australian group

Australian group

The works of the English group were very intriguing. I especially liked Lin Cheung’s work (in the bottom left of the below image) of 24 pennies made of gold ranging from 1 to 24 carat. The description of the story is beautiful and I think most evocative of the ‘transplantation’ concept.

English group

English group

Participating artists are:

Australia

  • Anna Davern, Melbourne (notoriously and gleefully Australiana-loving, and therefore a perfect artist to include in such a show) [website, my blog posts]
  • Roseanne Bartley, Melbourne [blog]
  • Joung-Mee Do, Melbourne [my blog posts]
  • Nick Bastin, Melbourne [my blog posts]
  • Sheridan Kennedy, Sydney [website]
  • Bridie Lander, Sydney/Birmingham

England

  • Jivan Astfalck, London
  • Norman Cherry, Lincoln
  • Jack Cunningham, Birmingham [website]
  • Laura Potter, London [website]
  • Lin Cheung, London [website]
  • Jo Pond, Derby [website]

The exhibition catalogue is available online here (pdf).

Transplantation‘ has been traveling [see other locations here] and is at Craft until 30th August 2014.

—-

Update (an hour after initial publication): it was remiss of me (well, forgetful actually) to omit that Zoe Brand wrote a well considered review of this exhibition catalogue for AJF last year – see it here.

At the time Zoe and I had a brief email exchange about what exactly ‘narrative‘ jewellery is/was … I’ve always struggled with these genre-definitional-related terms.

When asked ‘what I understood the term ‘narrative jewellery’ to mean‘, my immediate reply went like this: “[I] initially thought that it would be jewellery with a story, but then realised that almost all contemporary jewellery has a back-story or concept.  Well, let’s see : it’s not figurative, purely conceptual, status objects, ‘ugly / unwearable’, materiality-exploration, technique-driven, tradition-busting, form-focal, lyric … could it be political or social commentary, personal commentary? Thoughts then wandered to the narrative usually referring to a ‘story of the self’, told in first-person… does this always have to be done in a way that is obvious to a viewer (to enable categorisation)?“. Clearly confused.

I really enjoyed reading Zoe’s essay again after seeing the show … and completely agree with her statement: “the work of Australian Anna Davern is, for me, the most successful example of what I would call narrative work in this exhibition. There was absolutely no need to read her statement to understand what her work suggests. These half-man-half-animal figures immediately and with much humor allude to the shared and bloody history of both Australia and Britain.

—-





Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery @ Gallery Funaki

16 08 2014

It just may be that Gallery Funaki has never looked more enchanting or amazing.

It’s breathtaking; full, though beautifully arranged, with work from artists selected for the inaugural Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery.

photograph taken with gallery permisison

photograph taken with gallery permission

It’s quite a treat to see such exceptional quality and variety in the one exhibition.

Especially attractive in my eyes were:

  • little precise and refined silver-white (surface-depleted) brooches by Jo Hawley; in the foreground in the above image
  • gold fine linear neckpiece by Hermien Cassiers
  • beautifully coloured pieces by Kaori Juzu; especially the blue one, it reminded me of Anish Kapoor, I could have become lost in the blue interior
  • the astonishing brooches by Lore Langendries; while I couldn’t see myself wearing one, the treatment of the material (fur) is wonderful and shows genuine pathos and understanding
  • paper and stitched brooches by Gitte Nygaard; left in the below image

Honestly though, it’s hard not to find something to admire, learn from or desire in every one of the pieces.

photograph taken with gallery permission

photograph taken with gallery permission

I’m sad I couldn’t take more photographs – the gallery was quite busy at the time I was there, and I don’t like to include people in images (they may be gift shopping or meant to be somewhere else etc!).

My previous post shared the prize winners.

The exhibitors are:

  • Ela Bauer (Poland/Israel/The Netherlands) , Alexander Blank (Germany)
  • Conversation Piece (Sweden) , Hermien Cassiers (Belgium)
  • Jane Dodd (New Zealand) , Patrícia Correia Domingues (Portugal/Germany)
  • Benedikt Fischer (Austria/Germany) , Emi Fukuda (Japan/Germany)
  • Sara Gackowska (Poland) , Kiko Gianocca (Switzerland) , Marcos Guzman (Australia)
  • Jo Hawley (England/ New Zealand/Australia) , Therese Hilbert (Switzerland/Germany) , Lucie Houdková (Czech Republic) , Linda Hughes (Australia)
  • Kaori Juzu (Japan/Denmark)
  • Jiro Kamata (Japan/Germany) , Inari Kiuru (Finland/Australia) , Jun Konishi (Japan)
  • Lore Langendries (Belgium)
  • Carlier Makigawa (Australia)
  • Thanh-Truc Nguyen (Germany) , Gitte Nygaard (Denmark/The Netherlands)
  • Nelly van Oost (France/Belgium)
  • Martin Papcun (Czech Republic/Germany)
  • Mette Saabye (Denmark) , Michihiro Sato (Japan) , Helen Shirk (USA)
  • Blanche Tilden (Australia)
  • Julia Walter (Germany/The Netherlands)
  • Reinhold Ziegler (Norway)

This exhibition is a must-see. The Gallery Funaki website has images of each piece from each artist.

The Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery is at Gallery Funaki until 13th September 2014.